Category Archives: Abstract

Study Associates Gene with Cerebral Palsy and Death in Very Preterm Babies

In a study to be presented on Feb. 6 at 2:45 p.m. CST, at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine’s annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting ™, in New Orleans, researchers will report that a variant in SERPINE1, a gene involved in inflammation and blood clotting, is associated with cerebral palsy and death in very preterm babies. This gene has been associated with increased risk of cerebral palsy in one previous study of preterm babies.

Previous genetic studies of very preterm babies have suggested several genetic variations that might predispose to brain injury and developmental problems. However, different studies have had different results.

This study, titled Genetic Predisposition to Adverse Neurodevelopmental Outcome After Early Preterm Birth: A Validation Analysis, was a collaborative effort between the Eunice Kennedy Shriver NICHD Maternal-Fetal Medicine Units and Neonatal Research Networks.

Researchers evaluated two different populations of very early preterm births (earlier than 32 weeks) with the goal of confirming the same genetic risk factors in both groups. The first population of preterm births was enrolled in a large Neonatal Research Network study, and the other group was of births that were enrolled in a Maternal Fetal Medicine Units Network study of magnesium sulfate before preterm birth for prevention of cerebral palsy.

Results revealed a variant in the gene SERPINE1, a gene involved in inflammation and blood clotting, was associated with cerebral palsy and death after early preterm birth in both populations of preterm babies.

“Preterm birth is the leading cause of childhood brain injury in otherwise normal children. The earlier a baby is born, the higher the risk of brain injury. However, even among the tiniest preemies, some babies develop quite normally, while others have devastating brain injury and life-long disability,” said Erin Clark, M.D., the study’s author. “The reason for this difference in outcomes is not well understood. Genetics may allow identification of babies at increased risk so that we can target those babies for prevention and treatment strategies. These results add to the evidence that genes may play a role in risk of brain injury and death in preterm babies.”

Clark, assistant professor of Maternal Fetal Medicine, University of Utah School of Medicine’s Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, also noted that additional research is necessary to further evaluate genes that may influence risk and to determine how to apply these results to clinical care.

# # #

A copy of the abstract is available at http://www.smfmnewsroom.org and below.  For interviews please contact Vicki Bendure at Vicki@bendurepr.com 202-374-9259 (cell), or Meghan Blackburn at Meghan@bendurepr.com, 540-687-5099 (office) or 859-492-6303 (cell).

The Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine (est. 1977) is the premiere membership organization for obstetricians/gynecologists who have additional formal education and training in maternal-fetal medicine.  The society is devoted to reducing high-risk pregnancy complications by sharing expertise through continuing education to its 2,000 members on the latest pregnancy assessment and treatment methods. It also serves as an advocate for improving public policy, and expanding research funding and opportunities for maternal-fetal medicine. The group hosts an annual meeting in which groundbreaking new ideas and research in the area of maternal-fetal medicine are shared and discussed.  For more information visit www.smfm.org.

Financial Disclosure:  The authors did not report any potential conflicts of interest.

 

Abstract 15: Genetic Predisposition to Adverse Neurodevelopmental Outcome After Early Preterm Birth: A Validation Analysis

Author: Erin A. S. Clark, The Eunice Kennedy Shriver NICHD Maternal-Fetal Medicine Units and Neonatal Research Networks, Bethesda, MD  

Objective: Validate genetic risk loci associated with adverse neurodevelopment after early preterm birth.

Study Design: We previously conducted a large candidate gene association study in a cohort of 1013 extremely low birth weight infants (<1000 gms). The case-control analysis utilized samples in the NICHD Neonatal Research Network’s DNA Bank and evaluated 1634 SNPs in 145 genes in hypothesized causal pathways, with emphasis on inflammation, angiogenesis, and brain development. Cases were children who died by age 1 or who were diagnosed with CP or neurodevelopmental delay (Bayley II MDI or PDI <70) by 18-22 months. Controls were survivors with normal neurodevelopment. The outcomes of CP, combined CP or death, mental delay (MDI<70), and motor delay (PDI<70) were evaluated. Twenty-five SNPs with P<0.01 for one or more outcomes in the previous analysis were selected for validation in this analysis. Validation samples were derived from an RCT of magnesium sulfate before anticipated early preterm birth (<32 weeks) for prevention of cerebral palsy (CP). Case/control definitions were equivalent to the primary cohort, with the exception that neurodevelopmental outcomes were evaluated at 24 months. As in the primary analysis, four outcomes were evaluated. Cases and controls were matched for race and infant sex; covariates included gestational age at birth, small for gestational age, maternal education level, treatment group, and antenatal corticosteroids. Significance in the validation cohort was defined as P<0.05.

Results: The validation cohort included 364 infants, 170 cases and 192 controls. Three genetic loci from the primary analysis were significantly associated with the outcomes CP, CP/death and mental delay after early preterm birth in the validation analysis (Table).

Conclusion: Genetic loci involved in inflammation and brain development are associated with CP, CP/death, and mental delay after early preterm birth in primary and validation genetic analyses.

Table

Une étude montre que les injections de progestérone ne réduisent pas l’accouchement prématuré dans les grossesses de jumeaux

Résumé récipiendaire du prix March of Dimes au congrès SMFM

Dans une étude devant être présentée le 14 février entre 8 et 10 heures, au 33e congrès annuel de la Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine, The Pregnancy Meeting™, les chercheurs présenteront des résultats suggérant que le 17P, une forme de progestérone, n’est pas efficace pour prévenir l’accouchement prématuré chez les femmes enceintes de jumeaux, et il pourrait même être nocif.

Study Suggests That Genetic Predisposition to Brain Injury After Preterm Birth is Sex-Specific

In a study to be presented on February 14 between 1:15 p.m., and 3:30 p.m. PST, at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine’s annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting ™, in San Francisco, researchers will report that variation in a gene involved in inflammation is associated with developmental problems after preterm birth in females, but not males.

Study Finds That Caloric Restriction and Exercise Help to Prevent Weight Gain and Other Pregnancy Complications in Obese Women

In a study to be presented on February 15 between 1:15 p.m., and 3:30 p.m. PST, at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine’s annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting ™, in San Francisco, researchers will report findings that suggest that consistent physical activity and healthier lifestyle changes beginning in a woman’s first trimester can prevent excessive weight gain in obese pregnant women (with a Body Mass Index greater than 30), helping to avoid preterm delivery, hypertension and gestational diabetes.

Largest Population Based Study Finds Better Outcome for Frozen Embryo Replacement vs. IVF

In a study to be presented on February 14 between 1:15 p.m., and 3:30 p.m. PST, at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine’s annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting ™, in San Francisco, California, researchers will present findings showing perinatal outcomes of frozen/thawed embryo replacement (FER) have better outcomes compared to fresh in vitro fertilization (IVF), but worse outcomes compared to the non-IVF general population.

Study Suggests Around-the-Clock Labor Coverage is Associated with a Higher Likelihood of Trial of Labor for Women who Previously had Cesarean Delivery

In a study to be presented on February 16 between 8 a.m., and 10 a.m. PST, at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine’s annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting ™, in San Francisco, researchers will report findings that suggest around-the-clock labor and delivery coverage decreased the odds of cesarean delivery.

Comprehensive Maternal Hemorrhage Protocols Improve Patient Safety

In a study to be presented on February 16 between 8 a.m., and 10 a.m. PST, at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine’s annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting ™, in San Francisco, researchers will report findings that suggest comprehensive maternal hemorrhage protocols reduce utilization of blood products and improve patient safety.

Study Finds That Planned C-Sections Provide No Advantage Over Planned Vaginal Birth of Twins

In a study to be presented on February 14 between 8 a.m., and 10 a.m. PST, at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine’s annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting ™, in San Francisco, researchers will report findings that suggest that planned birthing of twins at 32-38 weeks by cesarean section does not decrease perinatal or neonatal death compared to planned vaginal birth.

MOD Award Abstract: Study Shows Progesterone Shots Do Not Reduce Preterm Delivery in Twin Pregnancies

In a study to be presented on February 14 between 8 a.m. and 10 a.m. PST, at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine’s 33rd annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting ™, researchers will report findings that suggest that 17P, a form of progesterone, is not effective in preventing preterm birth among women with twin pregnancies — and may possibly be harmful.

Differences in Obstetric Outcomes and Care Related to Race and Ethnicity

In a study to be presented on February 14 between 1:15 p.m., and 3:30 p.m. PST, at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine’s annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting ™, in San Francisco, California, researchers will present data showing racial and ethnic disparities exist for adverse obstetric outcomes.

Study Suggests Tightening up of Criteria For Definition Of Intrauterine Growth Restriction

In a study to be presented on February 14 between 1:15 p.m., and 3:30 p.m. PST, at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine’s annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting ™, in San Francisco, researchers will report that the practice of using an arbitrary Estimated Fetal Weight (EFW) less than the 10th centile may not be an efficient practice for defining true Intrauterine Growth Restriction (IUGR).

Study Shows New Model of “Laborist” Obstetrical Care Improves Pregnancy Outcomes

In a study to be presented on February 16 between 8 a.m., and 10 a.m. PST, at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine’s annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting ™, in San Francisco, researchers will report findings that suggest shifting from a traditional model of obstetrical care to a laborist model improves pregnancy outcomes.

REVISED: Preemptive Treatment of Severe Morning Sickness Decreases Suffering for Moms-to-Be

In a study to be presented on February 14 between 1:15 p.m., and 3:30 p.m. PST, at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine’s annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting ™, in San Francisco, California, researchers will present data showing the effectiveness of preemptive treatment for hyperemesis gravidarum and severe morning sickness.

Pregnant Gravidas with Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Cardiac Symptoms Have a 31Percent Incidence of Cardiac Dysfunction

In a study to be presented on February 15 between 8 a.m., and 10 a.m. PST, at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine’s annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting ™, in San Francisco, researchers will report findings that women with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and cardiac symptoms have a 31 percent incidence of cardiac dysfunction. The use of echocardiograms should be considered in the clinical management of these women.

Abnormal Brain Development in Fetuses of Obese Women

In a study to be presented on February 15 between 8 a.m. and 10 a.m. PST, at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine’s annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting ™, in San Francisco, California, researchers from Tufts Medical Center will present findings showing the effects of maternal obesity on a fetus, specifically in the development of the brain.

Policy Changes in Elective Delivery Proven Successful

In a study to be presented on February 14 between 1:15 p.m., and 3:30 p.m. PST, at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine’s annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting ™, in San Francisco, California, researchers will present data showing changes in elective delivery policy have been successful in reducing elective deliveries prior to 39 weeks.

Presence of Intra-amniotic Debris a Risk for Early Preterm Birth in First Pregnancy

In a study to be presented on February 14 between 8 a.m. and 10 a.m. PST, at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine’s annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting ™, in San Francisco, California, researchers will report findings suggesting an increased risk of early (less than 35 weeks) preterm birth when intra-amniotic debris is present in nulliparous women with a short cervix. The babies born to women with debris had worse outcomes than those born to women without debris, likely due to the earlier delivery.

Study Confirms Recurrence of Small-for-Gestational-Age Pregnancies

In a study to be presented on February 16 between 8 a.m., and 10 a.m. PST, at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine’s annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting ™, in San Francisco, researchers will report findings that suggest women whose babies are small-for-gestational-age (SGA) in their first pregnancy have a strongly increased risk for SGA in a second pregnancy.

Study Finds That Anti-diabetic Medication Can Prevent the Long Term Effects of Maternal Obesity

Full abstract at the bottom of the page. Click Here to view all 2012 abstracts.

Study Finds That Anti-diabetic Medication Can Prevent the Long Term Effects of Maternal Obesity

In a study to be presented today at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine’s annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting ™, in Dallas, Texas, researchers will report findings that show that short therapy with the anti-diabetic medication Pioglitazone can prevent the long term effects of maternal obesity on offspring.

Study Finds Elevated Levels of Cell-Free DNA in First Trimester Do Not Predict Preeclampsia

Full abstract at the bottom of the page. Click Here to view all 2012 abstracts.

Study Finds Elevated Levels of Cell-Free DNA in First Trimester Do Not Predict Preeclampsia

In a study to be presented today at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine’s annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting ™, in Dallas, Texas, researchers will report findings that  indicate that elevated levels of cell-free DNA in the first trimester do not predict the subsequent development of preeclampsia.

Powered by WordPress | Designed by: seo service | Thanks to seo company, web designers and internet marketing company