Category Archives: Labor

Study Suggests Around-the-Clock Labor Coverage is Associated with a Higher Likelihood of Trial of Labor for Women who Previously had Cesarean Delivery

In a study to be presented on February 16 between 8 a.m., and 10 a.m. PST, at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine’s annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting ™, in San Francisco, researchers will report findings that suggest around-the-clock labor and delivery coverage decreased the odds of cesarean delivery.

Study Shows New Model of “Laborist” Obstetrical Care Improves Pregnancy Outcomes

In a study to be presented on February 16 between 8 a.m., and 10 a.m. PST, at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine’s annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting ™, in San Francisco, researchers will report findings that suggest shifting from a traditional model of obstetrical care to a laborist model improves pregnancy outcomes.

Policy Changes in Elective Delivery Proven Successful

In a study to be presented on February 14 between 1:15 p.m., and 3:30 p.m. PST, at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine’s annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting ™, in San Francisco, California, researchers will present data showing changes in elective delivery policy have been successful in reducing elective deliveries prior to 39 weeks.

Study Finds Preterm Labor Diagnostic Markers Not Universal, Diagnosis and Interventions Should Not Be Generalized

Full abstract at the bottom of the page. Click Here to view all 2012 abstracts.

Study Finds Preterm Labor Diagnostic Markers Not Universal, Diagnosis and Interventions Should Not Be Generalized

In a study to be presented today at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine’s annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting ™, in Dallas, Texas, researchers will report findings that indicate that preterm birth interventions should be tailored for underlying risk factors and pathways.

Study Indicates That Induced Labor May Not Lower Risk of Infection or Respiratory Problems in Newborns

Full abstract at the bottom of the page. Click Here to view all 2012 abstracts.

Study Indicates That Induced Labor May Not Lower Risk of Infection or Respiratory Problems in Newborns 

In a study to be presented today at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine’s annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting ™, in Dallas, Texas, researchers will report findings that suggest that induction of labor in patients who suffer a rupture of membranes between the 34th and 37th week of gestation (before the onset of labor) does not reduce the risk of infection or respiratory problems in the newborn.

Study Finds Prior Preterm Delivery Indicates Subsequent Baby Will Be Small Even if Carried to Term

Full abstract at the bottom of the page. Click Here to view all 2012 abstracts.

Study Finds Prior Preterm Delivery Indicates Subsequent Baby Will Be Small Even if Carried to Term

In a study to be presented today at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine’s annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting ™, in Dallas, Texas, researchers will report findings that indicate that women who deliver their first baby early are more likely to have a subsequent baby that is small for its gestational age, even when the second pregnancy is carried to term.

WHITE PAPER: Quality Patient Care in Labor and Delivery: A call to Action

Introduction

Pregnancy and birth are physiologic processes, unique for each woman, that usually proceed normally. Most women have normal conception, fetal growth, labor, and birth and require minimal or no intervention in the process. Women and their families hold different views about childbearing based on their knowledge, experiences, belief systems, culture, and social and family backgrounds.

As representatives of professional societies whose members care for pregnant and laboring women, we agree that patient-centered and safe care of the mother and child enhance quality and is our primary priority. Optimal maternal health outcomes can best be achieved in an atmosphere of effective communication, shared decision-making, teamwork, and data-driven quality improvement initiatives.

“Patient-centered” means that health care providers, and the system in which they practice, accept that the values, culture, choices, and preferences of a woman and her family are relevant within the context of promoting optimal health outcomes. The overarching principles involved include treating all childbearing women with kindness, respect, dignity, and cultural sensitivity, throughout their maternity care experiences. Patient-centered care is enhanced when women are provided supportive resources such as education and skilled attendants. Specifically, patient-centered care requires a balance between maternal-child safety and well-being and the woman’s needs and desires.

2011: Leading Health Care Organizations Issue Recommendations for Quality Patient Care in Labor and Delivery

Unprecedented Collaboration Creates Joint Call to Action 

The nation’s leading health care organizations in the areas of obstetrics-gynecology, family medicine, and pediatrics issued an unprecedented call to action today for the nation’s health care providers and administrators.

The collaboration, which includes the American Academy of Family Physicians; the American Academy of Pediatrics; the American College of Nurse-Midwives; the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists; the American College of Osteopathic Obstetricians & Gynecologists; the Association of Women’s Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses; and the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine, was brought about by the need to develop an interdisciplinary collaborative approach to patient care to optimize maternal and fetal health outcomes.

2011: Study finds third trimester Group B Streptococcus screening does not accurately predict its presence during labor in a significant number of women

In a study to be presented today at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine’s (SMFM) annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting ™, in San Francisco, researchers will present findings that show that many women are having different test results for Group B streptococcus (GBS) between their routine third trimester screening and a rapid test performed at the time of labor.

2011: Study finds that women used 30 percent less analgesia during labor when they administered it themselves

In a study to be presented today at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine’s (SMFM) annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting ™, in San Francisco, researchers will present findings that show that when women administer their own patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) instead of getting a continuous epidural infusion (CEI) they used less analgesic, but reported similar levels of satisfaction.

Study finds that when first time mother are induced, breaking the amniotic membrane shortens delivery time significantly

In a study to be presented today at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine’s (SMFM) annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting ™, in San Francisco, researchers will present findings that show that by performing an amniotomy on first time mothers in situations when labor has to be induced, that delivery time can be shortened by more than 10 percent.

2011 March of Dimes Award Abstract: New research helps explain how progesterone prevents preterm birth

Research presented today at the 31st Annual meeting of the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine (SMFM) ― The Pregnancy Meeting™ has found that three proteins known as XIAP, BID, and Bcl-2 are responsible in part for the success of progesterone treatments in the prevention of preterm labor. They may also play an important role in triggering normal labor.

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