Category Archives: Patient Care

Pregnancy as a Window to Future Health – SMFM White Paper

The development of complications in pregnancy provides a new window of opportunity for early heart disease risk screening and intervention for women.

How Pregnancy Provides a Window to Future Health and Eliminating Some Chronic Disease

Physicians with the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine released a paper today that provides significant insight into future health conditions that women are likely to experience, and that can be detected early based on information relating to the course of pregnancy.  The paper, Pregnancy as a Window to Future Health: The development of complications in pregnancy provides a new window of opportunity for early heart disease risk screening and intervention for women, acknowledges that, for most women, the demands of pregnancy on the cardiovascular and metabolic systems are some of the highest the body will endure.

Study Suggests Around-the-Clock Labor Coverage is Associated with a Higher Likelihood of Trial of Labor for Women who Previously had Cesarean Delivery

In a study to be presented on February 16 between 8 a.m., and 10 a.m. PST, at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine’s annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting ™, in San Francisco, researchers will report findings that suggest around-the-clock labor and delivery coverage decreased the odds of cesarean delivery.

Comprehensive Maternal Hemorrhage Protocols Improve Patient Safety

In a study to be presented on February 16 between 8 a.m., and 10 a.m. PST, at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine’s annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting ™, in San Francisco, researchers will report findings that suggest comprehensive maternal hemorrhage protocols reduce utilization of blood products and improve patient safety.

MOD Award Abstract: Study Shows Progesterone Shots Do Not Reduce Preterm Delivery in Twin Pregnancies

In a study to be presented on February 14 between 8 a.m. and 10 a.m. PST, at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine’s 33rd annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting ™, researchers will report findings that suggest that 17P, a form of progesterone, is not effective in preventing preterm birth among women with twin pregnancies — and may possibly be harmful.

Differences in Obstetric Outcomes and Care Related to Race and Ethnicity

In a study to be presented on February 14 between 1:15 p.m., and 3:30 p.m. PST, at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine’s annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting ™, in San Francisco, California, researchers will present data showing racial and ethnic disparities exist for adverse obstetric outcomes.

REVISED: Preemptive Treatment of Severe Morning Sickness Decreases Suffering for Moms-to-Be

In a study to be presented on February 14 between 1:15 p.m., and 3:30 p.m. PST, at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine’s annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting ™, in San Francisco, California, researchers will present data showing the effectiveness of preemptive treatment for hyperemesis gravidarum and severe morning sickness.

Pregnant Gravidas with Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Cardiac Symptoms Have a 31Percent Incidence of Cardiac Dysfunction

In a study to be presented on February 15 between 8 a.m., and 10 a.m. PST, at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine’s annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting ™, in San Francisco, researchers will report findings that women with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and cardiac symptoms have a 31 percent incidence of cardiac dysfunction. The use of echocardiograms should be considered in the clinical management of these women.

Policy Changes in Elective Delivery Proven Successful

In a study to be presented on February 14 between 1:15 p.m., and 3:30 p.m. PST, at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine’s annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting ™, in San Francisco, California, researchers will present data showing changes in elective delivery policy have been successful in reducing elective deliveries prior to 39 weeks.

Study Finds That Anti-diabetic Medication Can Prevent the Long Term Effects of Maternal Obesity

Full abstract at the bottom of the page. Click Here to view all 2012 abstracts.

Study Finds That Anti-diabetic Medication Can Prevent the Long Term Effects of Maternal Obesity

In a study to be presented today at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine’s annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting ™, in Dallas, Texas, researchers will report findings that show that short therapy with the anti-diabetic medication Pioglitazone can prevent the long term effects of maternal obesity on offspring.

Study Finds Elevated Levels of Cell-Free DNA in First Trimester Do Not Predict Preeclampsia

Full abstract at the bottom of the page. Click Here to view all 2012 abstracts.

Study Finds Elevated Levels of Cell-Free DNA in First Trimester Do Not Predict Preeclampsia

In a study to be presented today at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine’s annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting ™, in Dallas, Texas, researchers will report findings that  indicate that elevated levels of cell-free DNA in the first trimester do not predict the subsequent development of preeclampsia.

Study Finds Massively Parallel Sequencing Can Detect Fetal Aneuploidies, Including Down Syndrome

Full abstract at the bottom of the page. Click Here to view all 2012 abstracts.

Study Finds Massively Parallel Sequencing Can Detect Fetal Aneuploidies, Including Down Syndrome

In a study to be presented today at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine’s annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting ™, in Dallas, Texas, researchers will report findings that indicate that massively parallel sequencing can be used to diagnose fetal aneuploidies, including Down syndrome, Edwards syndrome, Patau syndrome and Turner syndrome.

Study Weighs Risks and Benefits of Birthing Facilities

Full abstract at the bottom of the page. Click Here to view all 2012 abstracts.

Study Weighs Risks and Benefits of Birthing Facilities

In a study to be presented today at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine’s annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting ™, in Dallas, Texas, researchers will report findings that indicate that the risk of obstetric intervention is lower for women who deliver or intend to deliver outside of hospitals, but there are some higher risks for newborns intended for home births compared to hospital births.

Study Finds Preterm Labor Diagnostic Markers Not Universal, Diagnosis and Interventions Should Not Be Generalized

Full abstract at the bottom of the page. Click Here to view all 2012 abstracts.

Study Finds Preterm Labor Diagnostic Markers Not Universal, Diagnosis and Interventions Should Not Be Generalized

In a study to be presented today at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine’s annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting ™, in Dallas, Texas, researchers will report findings that indicate that preterm birth interventions should be tailored for underlying risk factors and pathways.

Study Finds Pregnant Women with Prior Cesarean Choose the Delivery Method Preferred by Their Doctor

Full abstract at the bottom of the page. Click Here to view all 2012 abstracts.

Study Finds Pregnant Women with Prior Cesarean Choose the Delivery Method Preferred by Their Doctor

 In a study to be presented today at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine’s annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting ™, in Dallas, Texas, researchers will report findings that women who have undergone one prior delivery via cesarean section appear to know little about the risks and benefits associated with undergoing either a second cesarean or trial of labor to attempt a vaginal delivery, and that the preference of their medical provider strongly affects their selection between the two options.

Study Finds Prior Preterm Delivery Indicates Subsequent Baby Will Be Small Even if Carried to Term

Full abstract at the bottom of the page. Click Here to view all 2012 abstracts.

Study Finds Prior Preterm Delivery Indicates Subsequent Baby Will Be Small Even if Carried to Term

In a study to be presented today at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine’s annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting ™, in Dallas, Texas, researchers will report findings that indicate that women who deliver their first baby early are more likely to have a subsequent baby that is small for its gestational age, even when the second pregnancy is carried to term.

WHITE PAPER: Quality Patient Care in Labor and Delivery: A call to Action

Introduction

Pregnancy and birth are physiologic processes, unique for each woman, that usually proceed normally. Most women have normal conception, fetal growth, labor, and birth and require minimal or no intervention in the process. Women and their families hold different views about childbearing based on their knowledge, experiences, belief systems, culture, and social and family backgrounds.

As representatives of professional societies whose members care for pregnant and laboring women, we agree that patient-centered and safe care of the mother and child enhance quality and is our primary priority. Optimal maternal health outcomes can best be achieved in an atmosphere of effective communication, shared decision-making, teamwork, and data-driven quality improvement initiatives.

“Patient-centered” means that health care providers, and the system in which they practice, accept that the values, culture, choices, and preferences of a woman and her family are relevant within the context of promoting optimal health outcomes. The overarching principles involved include treating all childbearing women with kindness, respect, dignity, and cultural sensitivity, throughout their maternity care experiences. Patient-centered care is enhanced when women are provided supportive resources such as education and skilled attendants. Specifically, patient-centered care requires a balance between maternal-child safety and well-being and the woman’s needs and desires.

2011: Leading Health Care Organizations Issue Recommendations for Quality Patient Care in Labor and Delivery

Unprecedented Collaboration Creates Joint Call to Action 

The nation’s leading health care organizations in the areas of obstetrics-gynecology, family medicine, and pediatrics issued an unprecedented call to action today for the nation’s health care providers and administrators.

The collaboration, which includes the American Academy of Family Physicians; the American Academy of Pediatrics; the American College of Nurse-Midwives; the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists; the American College of Osteopathic Obstetricians & Gynecologists; the Association of Women’s Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses; and the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine, was brought about by the need to develop an interdisciplinary collaborative approach to patient care to optimize maternal and fetal health outcomes.

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